why I stopped tracking

In 2012 I started tracking my food intake in a journal, I didn’t know an app existed for it and I liked the old fashioned pen and paper approach. The notebook and pen sat in the corner of my kitchen next to the food scales and my coffee machine. Each day I would write down how many calories each meal contained, I’d jot down the amount of water I drank and what exercise I did. I would try and calculate my deficit and then wait for weigh day to roll around…

I started counting calories at a young age, I was always super proud that I knew 1 peanut contained 25 calories. If I was ever offered a peanut, I’d politely decline ‘do you know how many calories are in those!?’

Calorie counting was easy for me, I could ready labels, I could measure out my foods and make sure I was getting the exact amount of calories I wanted. Except for when I would dine out, and then I was challenged by menus, and foods being cooked in oil or forgetting to ask for the sauce on the side – that one has brought me to tears in the past.

For the most part my weekly weigh ins were great, for months I consistently lost between one and three pounds. My trainer was always happy with my progress because despite my calorie tracking obsession I was seeing great results, I worked hard and he was being paid.

Then came the point at which I had a weight plateau. We’ve all been there, and previously I would have quit at this point, but because I was already down sixty pounds I decided to do some research instead. I finally read The Metabolic Effect Diet book, my mum had been raving about it for weeks, which of course I ignore because I was losing weight.

It was August 2012 when I had what I call my ‘Metabolic Effect Breakthrough’, we were in New York for our first wedding anniversary and we walked everywhere, everyday for hours. I went to the gym a few times and ran or lifted weights, but I ate bagels, pizza, burgers, cupcakes, ice-cream, all whilst feeling ‘guilty’ and dreading the scale when I returned home.

I lost four pounds that week.

I broke through my plateau and even though I went back and forth with calorie counting I always had the ME diet book in the back of my mind. This worked, this actually worked. How could this actually work, it’s too easy? It challenged everything I knew about dieting. 

Four years, a few more note books and an app later, I don’t track calories or macros. I am now at a point where eating the healthy stuff first is automatic, I try to limit the processed foods and not only do I know that there are 25 calories in a peanut, I also know that I don’t care. Does it matter if I am eating 1 peanut, if I would go and binge on thousands of calories later? Of course not.

One peanut, one cookie, one meal doesn’t stop you from achieving your long term goals, but quitting and giving up on your good habits does.

As Dr Jade Teta says ‘You arrive, when arrival is no longer the goal’

I know first hand how scary it is that all of a sudden you are being challenged to change your unhealthy habits and do it in a way that doesn’t seem accurate. The idea that doing less exercise or eating a little more ‘loosely’ could get you results seems like a fluke, right? The funny thing is that it’s not a fluke, its your body saying ‘Oh hey you changed the way you are treating me. I am going to allow you to see some results’

Your metabolism [the very thing dieting wrecks] doesn’t care if you are a size 2 or 18, it cares about how you are treating it.

This week I launched my 12 week coaching program The Four Pillar Formula and registration closes Friday July 8th at MIDNIGHT. My Four Pillar approach takes you through the steps needed to allow you to start to repair your metabolism, lose fat, change your body and lose weight forever. I know that this program works, and will help you because it’s the constant ‘starting over’ that makes us gain weight. Grab your spot on The Four Pillar Formula here. 

 

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